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The Influence of Citizenship Norms and Media Use on Different Modes of Political Participation in the US

Lauren Copeland, Jessica Feezell

Cover of The Influence of Citizenship Norms and Media Use on Different Modes of Political Participation in the US

Studies demonstrate that citizenship norms and media use are important predictors of political behavior. However, it remains unclear how norms and patterns of media use influence different modes of political participation—both directly and in tandem. Here, we leverage original US survey data (N = 2200) to clarify how people’s attitudes about what it means to be a “good citizen” inform how they participate in politics, and whether certain types of media use moderate these relationships. In contrast to previous studies, we find that actualizing norms are associated with electoral, non-electoral, and individualized modes of political participation, but dutiful norms are not. In addition, although digital and traditional media use have distinct relationships with participation, there is little moderating influence. Collectively, these findings raise questions about whether the boundaries between dutiful and actualizing norms—and electoral and non-electoral participation, respectively—are still relevant in the contemporary media environment.

Copeland, Lauren & Jessica Feezell. 2017. "The Influence of Citizenship Norms and Media Use on Different Modes of Political Participation in the US". Political Studies, 1-19.

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