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Jessica T. Feezell

Assistant Professor

Photo: Jessica Feezell
Email:  jfeezell@unm.edu
Personal Website
 
Curriculum vitae
 
Office:  SSCO 2046

Research Area/s:

American Politics,  Public Policy

Biography:

Jessica Feezell earned her BA from the University of Oregon (2000) and her PhD in Political Science from the University of California, Santa Barbara (2008).  Professor Feezell specializes in American politics and political communication.  She joined the UNM faculty as a Visiting Assistant Professor in 2012 after teaching for three years at UCSB during which time she also worked for the Civic Engagement Research Group at Mills College as a Research Consultant.  She moved from visiting to tenure-track status in August, 2014. Professor Feezell's research draws on scholarship in public opinion, media, political participation, civic engagement, and public policy.  Her work has been published in several journals including Political Research Quarterly, PS: Political Science and Politics, New Media & Society, Journal of Information Technology and Politics, International Journal of Communication, Computers in Human Behavior, and Public Understanding of Science.  She is also co-author of The Politics of Energy Crises (2016) published by Oxford University Press. Professor Feezell was appointed as a 2015-2016 UNM Teaching Fellow and is the recipient of a 2016 Women in STEM Faculty Development Grant from UNM. 

Research Interests

Professor Feezell's current research agenda runs along two paths.  The first addresses media, information, and the civic engagement of youth.  This research explores the effects that new and less-traditional media formats such as social media have on youth in terms of political and civic engagement.  Her work in this area finds that new media applications and Internet use often have positive effects in terms of the political and civic engagement of youth. The second path calls on research in public opinion, agenda setting, and public policy to explore policy change in the U.S.  She is co-author of The Politics of Energy Crises (2016) that explores the relationship between public opinion, trust, and public policy cycles as they relate to energy policy in the United States.  This project utilizes quantitative, experimental, and qualitative research techniques to better understand trust in sources of information regarding energy policy and the cyclical nature of energy crises and public opinion.

Recent Accomplishments

Professor Feezell has been awarded a 2016 Women in STEM Faculty Development Grant from UNM to study framing effects and blame attribution towards Muslim Americans.

Professor Feezell was appointed as a 2015-2016 UNM Teaching Fellow to develop and study a Twitter-based curricular component for introductory American politics courses. ​ She was selected from a large pool of excellent applicants because of her demonstrated commitment to teaching, the quality of her proposed teaching project, and the support of her Department Chair.

Professor Feezell's co-authored article, "Colleague Crowdsourcing: A Method for Fostering National Student engagement and Large-N Data Collection" was recently published in PS: Political Science and Politics.

Professor Feezell's paper "Facebook is... Fostering Political Engagement: A Study of Online Social Networking Groups and Offline Participation" (co-authored with Meredith Conroy and Mario Guerrero) won the “Best Graduate Student Paper Award in Information Technology and Politics,” presented at the American Political Science Association annual meeting, Washington D.C. (2010).

Selected Publications

  • Carlisle, J., Feezell, J.T., Michaud, K., & Smith, E.R.A.N. (2016). The Politics of Energy Crises. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Feezell, J.T. (2016). Predicting online political participation: The importance of selection bias and selective exposure in the online setting. Political Research Quarterly, 69(3), 495-509.
  • Feezell, J.T., Conroy, M., & Guerrero, M. (2016). Internet use and political participation: Engaging citizenship norms through online activities. Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 13(2), 95-107.
  • Boydstun, A.E., Feezell J.T., Glazier, R.A., Jurka, T., Pietryka, M.T., & Reilly, J. (2014). Colleague crowdsourcing: A method for incentivizing national student engagement and large-N data collection. PS: Political Science and Politics, 47(4), 829-834.
  • Kahn, J., N. Lee, and J.T. Feezell. “The Civic and Political Impact of Online Participatory Cultures Among Youth Transitioning to Adulthood.” Journal of Information Technology & Politics, 10, no. (2012): 1-20.
  • M. Cory, J. Feezell, and M. Guerrero.  2012.  “Facebook is… Fostering Political Engagement: A Study of Online Social Networking Groups and Offline Participation.”  Computers in Human Behavior, 28 (5): 1535-1546.
  • J. Kahn, N. Lee, and J. Feezell.  2011. “Digital Media Literacy Education and Online Civic and Political Participation.”  International Journal of Communication 5: 1–20.
  • J. Kahn, E. Midday, N. Lee, J. Feezell. 2011. “Youth Online Activity and Exposure to Diverse Perspectives.”  New Media and Society, October: 1-21.
  • J. Carlisle, J. Feezell, K. Nihau, E.R.A.N. Smith, and L. Smith.  2010. “The Public's Trust in Scientific Claims Regarding Offshore Oil Drilling.” Public Understanding of Science, 19 (5): 514-527.
  • Eric R.A.N. Smith, J. Carlisle, J. Feezell, K. Nihau, and L. Smith.  2010. “Persuading the public to believe in science,” People & Science, December: 17.